dispensary technician course

Cannabis Dosing Guide

There are various ways to consume cannabis, each with its own benefits. This article will discuss the most common methods of consuming cannabis along with a dosing guide for each one. Gaining the mental and physical benefits of cannabis depends mainly on how it is consumed. Each method provides a unique experience and set of effects. Who knows — you could find a new favorite. Whether you are a first-time user or an experienced consumer, this cannabis dosing guide will help you choose the best route of administration for you. So, let’s get started!

Cannabis Dosing Guide

First and foremost, before deciding the best method of consumption, you must consider dosing. Because different methods of ingestion impact the body in various ways and at varying speeds, the suggested dosages vary with each method. Keep in mind that while it is difficult to give precise strain and dose recommendations simultaneously, each person’s Endocannabinoid system responds to cannabis differently.

Finding the proper dose will get easier as you become more familiar with each product. We typically recommend starting with a low dose and gradually increasing from there. Remember, you can always add more later, but you might get a different result than you were expecting if you try too much at once.

Method: Inhale 

Description: Inhalants are processed instantly through the lungs before entering the bloodstream.  

Routes of Administration:  

  • Bong 
  • Pipe  
  • Joints + Blunts 
  • Vapes  
  • Inhalers  

Pros: Rapid and instant onset, more potent and consistent effects  

Cons: Leaves behind a strong odor, making this one of the least private methods. It can also be difficult on the respiratory system. 

Onset Time | Lasting Effects: Instant | Can last around 45min to 1 hour 

Dosing Guidelines:  

Because the effects of inhaling cannabis may be felt almost immediately, controlling the dosage is much easier than with other consumption methods. One or two inhalations from a joint, pipe, blunt, bong, or vape are all it takes for an inexperienced user to experience THC’s euphoric effects. On the other hand, those with greater tolerances may need a few more “hits.”

Method: Sublingual 

Description: Sublingual products enter the bloodstream when processed through glands under the tongue.  

Routes of Administration:  

  • Tinctures 
  • Oral Tablets 
  • Sprays
  • Strips 
  • Pouches 

Pros: One of the most discreet methods of consumption, quick onset, consistent, reliable dosing 

Cons: Effects can diminish quicker than ingestible edibles and, when taken alone, can sometimes have a more natural, unpleasant taste.

Onset Time | Lasting Effects: 10-30 min. | Effects can last 2-4 hours 

Dosing Guidelines: 

A few (2-4) drops under the tongue are usually sufficient for tinctures. Tablets, Strips, and Pouches will all be individually dosed with a set amount of MG. Before you decide if you want to take another dose, wait 30 minutes.

Method: Ingestible 

Description: Ingestible products are metabolized through the digestive system before entering the bloodstream. 

Routes of Administration: 

  • Edibles 
  • Beverages  
  • Capsules 
  • Powders 
  • Ingestible Oils 

Pros: Delicious and discreet, longer-lasting effects, more potent, more consistent high  

Cons: Onset is much slower and can sometimes mislead consumers to eat more than the recommended dose.  

Onset Time | Lasting Effects: 45min to 1 hour | Effects usually last 4-6 hours. 

Dosing Guidelines:

Because the cannabinoids in ingestible products are absorbed through the gastrointestinal (G.I.) tract and processed through the liver, the onset time will vary depending on your metabolism. Several other factors play into the onset time, like how much food is already in the stomach or how hydrated the body is. The delayed onset time makes controlling the dose of an ingestible slightly more difficult. The general rule of thumb is to START SLOW! 

  • For novice consumers, a 2.5mg THC dose is usually sufficient. Before eating another 2.5mg dose, wait around an hour to see if you feel anything. 
  • For the occasional consumer, to find your desired effects, start with a 5-10mg THC dose and work your way up if necessary. 
  • Lastly, you might need 10mg+ THC to feel your desired effects for those with higher tolerances or specific medical needs. 

Method: Topical/Transdermal 

Description: Topical products are applied to and absorbed by the skin. Topicals are generally non-intoxicating because they do not enter the bloodstream. Transdermal products are applied to the skin then cannabinoids are absorbed into the bloodstream. Since transdermals do absorb into the bloodstream, this can sometimes cause intoxicating effects.  

Routes of Administration: 

  • Lotions  
  • Balms + salves 
  • Oils  
  • Patches 
  • Bath Bombs 

Pros: Provides local relief that does not require inhaling smoke or eating any calories, usually non-intoxicating, unless it is a transdermal product.  

Cons: Usually a topical needs to be applied multiple times throughout the day for longer-lasting effects 

Onset Time | Lasting Effects: 5-10 min | 45min – 1 hour 

Dosing Guidelines: 

You can apply topical products liberally for localized for relief. Since topicals are non-intoxicating, you run minimal risk of going overboard on dosing. For first-timers using transdermal patches, start with a smaller dose or cut the patch in half, wait 15-30 minutes, and gradually increase if needed. For those who have a higher tolerance, the entire patch or a greater dose may work for you. There are also cannabinoid-specific patches that can help aid with pain, inflammation, and sleep so that you can target your desired effect with these.  

With so many ways to consume cannabis, knowing which one is best for you can be challenging. The most important thing about choosing a consumption method is that it should fit your lifestyle and needs. We hope we have helped guide you in the right direction by providing an overview of each route of administration and what they offer. Have fun experimenting with different methods until you find the perfect fit! If you cannot find an answer in this article, we have many other articles about marijuana use as well! Whether it be a physical or mental high, there is no shortage of options to choose from when it comes to consuming this popular plant. 

To learn more about cannabis, click here for our free online course on Effectively Communicating as a Dispensary Tech.

Job Interview Tips: What Not to Say to a Hiring Manager

As we head into the new year, we wanted to share some of our best interview tips. In an interview, your primary aim is to show the hiring manager why you -above all other candidates- are the ideal hire for the position. Your goal is to show you have the correct set of talents, a good personality, and enough drive to execute in your new job. However, while you’re working on your interview responses, it’s critical to understand what the hiring manager considers a red flag. After all, a few missteps, and it won’t matter how successful your sales numbers were at your prior position.

Job interviews can be nerve-wracking. If you want to make a good impression, it’s essential to avoid saying the wrong thing. You don’t want anything to damage your chances of getting the job. 

We put together some responses you should avoid using to assist you in your interview process. You’ll ensure that your unique talents and accomplishments—not a massive blunder—are what your interviewer remembers.

Here are our top three job interview tips for “What NOT to say” to a hiring manager.

1. “I don’t have any experience doing this kind of work.” 

The fact is, many successful job applicants didn’t have much experience in the position they were hired for. But, that doesn’t matter. Don’t go out of your way to emphasize your lack of expertise in the specific industry. Try to describe your abilities and transferrable skills from previous jobs that would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for.

2. Criticize Your Previous Employer

Don’t criticize your previous employer or talk negatively about your last employment. This demonstrates your ability to remain calm and professional in any scenario. If you are openly critical, the interviewer could think, “What is this person going to say about our company to others?” Always be polite and upbeat! – Kevin Kan, Break Out Consulting Asia

3. “I didn’t have time to do any research on your company.”

This is the one thing that will immediately scare off any potential employer. Make time to study the company, the role, and the individual interviewing you in advance. This shows how serious you are about the prospective job and that you are diligent. Additionally, when researching a company and an interviewer, you build a connection to the position while gaining a deeper understanding of what tasks may lay ahead in your future employment.

If you are looking for a new job, it’s essential to believe in yourself and your abilities. To increase your odds of landing any job opportunity, be confident about what you have done so far in life and think outside the box when answering questions during an interview. You may not be able to predict every question they’re going to ask, but there are specific themes throughout most interviews that can help guide your responses. With this in mind, we hope these job interview tips will give you some pointers on how to land your next dream position! 

To learn more about the different career opportunities in cannabis click here.

9 Most In-Demand Cannabis Jobs

As an emerging legal industry, cannabis has created hundreds of thousands of new jobs across the nation. For many years the opportunities were few and far between and mostly limited to the West Coast. Now, as more states shift toward legalization we are beginning to see higher demand for new jobs throughout the Midwest and the East Coast. As companies grow, the demand for skilled professionals has continued to rise. As the new 2020 Salary Guide released by Cannabiz Team shows, this demand has already resulted in a more robust market in jobs and opportunities with good salaries, as companies are always actively searching for individuals with the right talents and experience to make their brand successful. 

According to analysis from the 2021 MJBizFactbook, the marijuana industry will employ 340,000-415,000 full-time equivalent workers across the United States in 2021 and grow to 545,000-600,000 by 2025. Despite the pandemic, an economic recession, and unemployment spikes, the legal cannabis industry has seen exponential growth. 

Here are some of the most in-demand cannabis jobs across the U.S.:

Cannabis Jobs: Budtender/Dispensary Agent ($35,000-$42,000)

The most popular entry-level cannabis career is the role of a budtender. Typically, budtenders work behind the counter of a cannabis dispensary; as the face of the business, and help guide customers towards the best cannabis options for them. This role is suited for product specialists that have a keen eye for top quality products, are sales-oriented, and driven by customer-service.

Budtender positions are highly competitive in the workforce, receiving hundreds of resume submissions daily. To get an interview you will need to stand out – Here are a few skills that may help you land a budtender role:

Cannabis Jobs: Delivery Driver ($37,000-$60,000)

There is a huge demand for cannabis delivery drivers as retailers and brands start to offer delivery services. In the cannabis industry drivers can work for the licensed retailer, extractor, or cultivator. Which means, there are plenty of sectors for job opportunities. 

You must have a clean driving record to be considered for a cannabis delivery driver position. Additionally, some states might also require a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) or a Chauffeur’s license. Some skills that would be beneficial for this position include:

  • Experience with cash handling procedures
  • Exceptional customer service skills
  • Experience as a delivery or service driver (Uber, Lyft, etc.)

Cannabis Jobs: Trimmer ($35,000-$41,000)

If you’re passionate about cannabis cultivation and don’t mind getting a little dirty, the role of trimmer could be right up your alley. An ideal trimmer will need to know the intricacies of pruning the cannabis plant without harming it. 

The role of the trimmer is one of the more competitive jobs, as they are essential to any cannabis cultivation facility. Historically, the trimmer position was a seasonal job. Now, more cultivation facilities are starting to hire part-time to full-time positions as they expand. Trimmers take care of equipment maintenance, sanitation and execute correct manicuring and storing procedures. Here are some of the skills and experiences needed to help you land a trimmer position:

  • Prior cultivation experience
  • Experience in a fast-paced environment
  • Strong attention to detail 

Cannabis Jobs: Cannabis Extraction Technician ($39,000-$61,000)

There are various extraction methods cannabis growers use to remove essential cannabinoids. Cannabis extraction technicians will create concentrates in wax, tinctures, oils, or topical lotions. To apply for this position you will need to be well seasoned in several extraction techniques. 

With hemp becoming nationally legal, it’s more common to find extraction technicians jobs across the nation. Although, this isn’t your typical entry-level cannabis job, those who love science and have experience in chemistry will fit right in.

Check out some general requirements for this role:

  • Extraction purification and analysis experience
  • Bachelor’s or Associate’s degree in chemistry (preferred)
  • 1+ years of experience in extraction 

Cannabis Jobs: Marketing Manager ($48,000-$78,000)

Today, marketing plays a significant factor in any space and cannabis is no different. From e-commerce and delivery services to retail storefronts and CPG. There are plenty of entry-level marketing specialist roles you can pursue if you have some experience. Just remember, since cannabis is still federally illegal each state has its own set of regulations for marketing and advertising. Typical areas of expertise include search engine optimization (SEO), copywriting, retail marketing, CPG, e-commerce, branding, advertising, photography, social media management, or graphic design. Cannabis marketers are always thinking of creative and unique ways to build a brand’s account around the regulations. Here are some general requirements for a cannabis marketing role:

  • Bachelor’s degree in communications, marketing, or English
  • Experience with email marketing platforms
  • SEO course education or experience

Cannabis Jobs: Compliance Officer – VP of Compliance ($60,000-$120,500)

The regulated cannabis market lives and breathes compliance. Businesses will make significant investments to mitigate risk of falling out of compliance and potentially losing their license.

Compliance helps businesses and employees avoid legal trouble by ensuring they have proper operating procedures in place to align with the state’s regulations. Having someone to ensure the business is running legally is essential to keeping the doors open. The compliance department needs to understand the entire operation to ensure that all day-to-day procedures are legal. To sum it up, compliance requires strong attention to detail and a deep grasp of legal language. since the government can pursue legal action against a business if they are not operating within the law. Typical skills and requisites for a compliance officer include:

  •  BS/BA in law, finance, business administration, or a related field
  •  Excellent knowledge of reporting procedures and record-keeping
  •  Familiar with SOP’s
  •  Methodical and diligent with outstanding planning abilities

Cannabis Jobs: Outside Sales Representative – Account Executive ($65,000-$134,500)

Sales is one position that doesn’t exactly require previous cannabis experience to be successful. Account executives and sales representatives are responsible for selling their brand’s cannabis products to dispensaries. Once the product is on the shelves, it is up to the sales representative to find creative ways to sell through the product. This could include managing brand ambassadors, working with the marketing team to create promotions to drive sales, and hosting budtender training sessions. To work in cannabis sales there are a few skills that will give you a leg up on your resume:   

  • Undergraduate degree in business or sales
  • Previous sales experience (common industries include: liquor, hospitality, or other luxury goods)
  • Experience with analytics and knowledge of CRM systems and ordering tools

Cannabis Jobs: Director of Cultivation ($78,000-$158,000)

It all begins here. From seed to sale, the Director of Cultivation is in charge of spearheading all processes to grow quality cannabis. In short, this position is responsible for the entire growth operation. Understanding the cultivation operations — especially on a large scale, is quite possibly one of the most difficult positions in this industry. Growing cannabis on a grand scale is your dream; pursuing cultivation might be for you. Here are a few of the requirements.

  • Masters of Agriculture (preferred)
  • Ph.D. in Agriculture (preferred) 
  • Ability to grow the business through operational processes, employee and staff capabilities, and financial performance
  • Must be a certified pesticide applicator

Cannabis Jobs: Accounting & Finance: Controller ($79,000-$130,000)

Like with any business, to be successful, you need to ensure that you have a proper understanding of your finances. Cannabis can be even more challenging than other businesses, as banks are still unable to legally work with cannabis companies. Without federal legalization, most cannabis businesses are forced to run off cash. This means a lot of cash has to be counted before it shows up on a spreadsheet and then into the proper bank account. You can imagine this has created an urgent requirement for financial experts to keep track of the company’s cash flow. Financial training can be found at many schools; however, when it comes to experience, financial professionals who work in the casino or nightlife industry often have a grip on what it means to run the finance department of a cannabis business. 

  • Bachelor’s degree in Accounting or Finance required; CPA/MBA preferred
  • Experience in presenting to investors and raising capital
  • Manufacturing and Cost Accounting knowledge a plus

Now that you’ve seen a list of the most in-demand cannabis jobs, how much they pay, and the skills needed, which one will you go after?

*Note: These are average base salaries from Indeed.com. Pay rates can vary by state or country, as well as the size of the company. Benefits can range from basic health insurance options to bonuses and 401k plans.

Understanding the Laws Regulating Medical Marijuana

What is Medical Marijuana?

Medical marijuana refers to any part of the cannabis plant that can be used to alleviate a variety of health conditions. When people use medical marijuana, they are seeking relief from pain and medical symptoms, not to get high.

The cannabis that is legally sold in dispensaries for medicinal purposes is typically the same as the kind used for pleasure. However, as research continues to identify how the chemicals in the cannabis plant react in the human body, new strains of medical marijuana are being developed with a focus on health benefits and fewer chemicals that cause mind altering effects.

CBD vs. THC

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of the most commonly used cannabinoids extracted from the cannabis plant. After CBD is removed from the plant, it is mixed with a carrier oil such as hemp seed or coconut oil. It is known to have therapeutic effects to alleviate conditions such as nerve issues, PTSD, physical pain, epilepsy, and autism.

THC is the psychoactive compound that is responsible for the psychological effects of cannabis. THC causes cells in the brain to release dopamine, which is what creates its feelings of euphoria.

CBD affects the body very differently than THC. Compared to THC, it would take almost 100 times more CBD to have any impact on the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Unlike THC, CBD does not cause any feelings of euphoria or intoxication, which makes it an acceptable medical treatment that is safer than the addiction and overdose issues associated with opioids that are traditionally prescribed to manage pain.

Federal vs. State Marijuana Laws

Cannabis is a prohibited substance according to the Controlled Substances Act that was passed in 1970.  Under this act, the Drug Enforcement Administration considers marijuana  a Schedule I drug.  This means that it is prohibited because of its potential for abuse, and there are not believed to be any medically acceptable uses.

Many more laws regarding the use of cannabis have been added, amended, repealed, and reinstated since the 70s.  Today, there are over 30 states that have legalized the possession of medical marijuana.  One of the main concerns with legalizing marijuana in individual states is that it is still considered illegal by the federal government. Federal laws take precedence over state laws, which means that you can be arrested and prosecuted for having and using medical marijuana, even if it is legal in your state.

Most of the state medical marijuana laws protect not only the users of medical marijuana, but they also protect their caregivers who may supply their medical marijuana. Many of the state laws include lists of specific conditions that qualify for the use of medical marijuana.

FDA Approval

Currently, the Food and Drug Administration has not approved cannabis for the treatment of any specific diseases or conditions. However, the FDA has approved some drugs that do contain cannabis.  These include Epidiolex, Marinol, Syndros, and Cesamet. These cannabis-derived drugs can only be purchased with a prescription from a licensed healthcare practitioner.

Learn More About Medical Marijuana

The legalization of medical cannabis is advancing worldwide, and there is much more that you can learn about medical marijuana and its use in the healthcare industry.  cannabiscareer.com, a leader in education with nationally accredited colleges, offers courses to help educate the growing global community of healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients who want to learn about the science and clinical data behind medical cannabis.

How Cannabis Is Changing the Healthcare Industry

Legality of Marijuana

In the United States, marijuana has been legalized in over 30 states.  However, it still has not been legalized by the federal government. With at least several million Americans using medical marijuana, a majority of the country is in favor of complete legalization.

Uses of Medical Marijuana

One of the most popular uses of medical marijuana is to help control pain. While marijuana may not be strong enough to reduce severe pain, it has proven to minimize many types of chronic pain effectively. Part of the appeal in using marijuana to alleviate pain is a reduced risk of overdoses and addiction which are associated with opiates. It is also a safe alternative for people who cannot take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like Aleve and Advil.

Marijuana is frequently used to lessen nerve pain, especially that associated with multiple sclerosis.  Currently, there are few other options that have proven as effective. Patients suffering from multiple sclerosis report that medical marijuana has helped them to resume their normal activities without feeling the side effects associated with more traditional medical treatments.

Other uses for medical marijuana include the management of nausea, weight loss, and glaucoma. Marijuana is said to work well as a muscle relaxant and can help to reduce the severity of tremors experienced by those suffering from Parkinson’s disease. Additionally, it has been successfully used to treat wasting syndrome associated with HIV, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, interstitial cystitis, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, and a variety of other conditions involving chronic pain.

Marijuana Is Changing Healthcare

As medical marijuana continues to replace other drug alternatives, states where marijuana has been legalized are reporting fewer deaths from opioid overdoses. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported that states with legalized medical marijuana have seen a 25 percent reduction in opioid-related deaths compared to states that do not permit the medical use of marijuana. Supporting marijuana as a replacement for opioids could also help to reduce America’s addiction epidemic which claims an average of 115 lives every day.

Increased Jobs in Healthcare

Medical marijuana is being used across the globe and continues to explode in the United States.  This dynamic growth is leading to new employment opportunities in the healthcare industry.  According to Marijuana Business Daily, approximately 215,000 new jobs have been created, with that number potentially growing to 475,000 by the year 2023.

Since education on the science of medical cannabis is generally not included in most medical training programs, there is a demand for healthcare professionals with this specific training.  To meet growing demand for sound, fair, balanced, and relevant medical cannabis education, cannabiscareer.com offers online courses to help educate healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients who want to learn more about medical cannabis.

Throughout our course, you will learn everything from the history of cannabis to how cannabis products affect the human body, as well as how to effectively communicate as a Cannabis Dispensary Technician.  Earning your Dispensary Tech Certificate from cannabiscareer.com will give you a deep understanding of what a Dispensary Tech does and the underlying chemistry of how cannabis works on the body.

At cannabiscareer.com, our staff is highly educated and experienced, offering a winning approach to providing career training to prepare you for your new cannabis career path.

What You Need to Know About Becoming a Budtender

The Legalization of Medical Marijuana

It’s an exciting time in the medical industry with the increase in alternative medicines such as medical marijuana. The legalization of cannabis is creating an entirely new segment of jobs that didn’t exist previously. If you are considering a career in the healthcare field, becoming a cannabis dispensary technician may be just what you are looking for.

As marijuana becomes legal in more and more states, every day, more cannabis companies are popping up, offering high-demand career opportunities. With the cannabis industry growing at such a fast pace, now is an excellent time to pursue an education that can help you prepare for a well-paying job with plenty of opportunities for advancement.

Although cannabis is still banned at the federal level in the United States, as of October 2019, medical marijuana has been legalized and is regulated in over 30 states. According to Marijuana Business Daily, the acceptance of medical marijuana has led to approximately 215,000 new jobs, and by 2023, that number could grow to 475,000.

Cannabis Dispensary Technician

One of the many career options in this growing industry is budtender, also known as a cannabis dispensary technician. According to Payscale.com, the median salary for a budtender in 2018 was $32,000. In addition to hourly wages or a set salary, many budtenders also earn tips.

This job requires a wide range of skills, from customer service abilities to a scientific understanding of the products that are sold in a dispensary. Budtenders need to be comfortable working with people to help them understand different strains of cannabis, as well as the varying levels and combinations of THC and CBD.

Marijuana dispensaries hire budtenders as their salespeople with the expectation that they will be product experts. A budtender is expected to know the current marijuana industry trends by researching products, attending trade shows, and learning about partner dispensaries. Budtenders must also ensure compliance with the local laws governing marijuana usage.

Part of the job is to ensure customer satisfaction by helping customers select the appropriate products for their needs. This means that as a budtender, not only do you need to know your products, but you also need to learn about your customers so you can make appropriate recommendations. You have to be comfortable asking people questions about their budget, lifestyle, and history of marijuana use.

How to Become a Budtender

There are several courses available to become a certified Cannabis Dispensary Technician. Classes may be offered in a traditional classroom setting as well as online. At cannabiscareer.com, we off a Cannabis Dispensary Technician Course that covers all areas of knowledge, including botany, biology, history, safety, and even customer service. Our goal is to establish a high level of comfort in a cannabis dispensary, which leads to great experiences for you as an employee and for your customers as well.

The course consists of 11 modules, each containing a variety of media to learn, including text, videos, and current articles. There are quizzes along the way to reinforce important information and an exam at the end of each module.

  1. History of Cannabis and the Cannabis Dispensary Technician
  2. Basic Infection Control and Safety in the Cannabis Dispensary
  3. The Endocannabinoid System
  4. Phytocannabinoids
  5. Pharmaceuticals (synthetic cannabinoids)
  6. The Human Body and Responsive Conditions to Medical Cannabis
  7. Modes of Delivery, Routes of Administration and Dosages
  8. Effectively Communicating as a Cannabis Dispensary Technician
  9. Risk Factors, Adverse Effects, and Appropriate Responses to Complications Associated with Cannabis Distribution and Use
  10. Legal and Ethical Issues Related to the Distribution and Use of Cannabis
  11. The Future of Cannabis Research

Get the Knowledge You Need

If you are a people person with an interest in the growing medical marijuana industry, a career as a budtender may be just the job you are looking for. This industry is expected to experience strong job growth as medical marijuana becomes an accepted alternative to traditional pharmaceuticals. One of the essential skills you need as a budtender is product knowledge and industry knowledge. At cannabiscareer.com, we can make sure you get the education you need for a successful career as a Cannabis Dispensary Technician.

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