medical marijuana

11 Medical Marijuana Terms You Need to Know

If you are already familiar with the recreational uses of marijuana, you may be considering a career in the medical marijuana industry.  While you may know what a marijuana plant looks like and what a bud is, there’s much more you need to learn if you want to work in a medical marijuana dispensary.  We’ve put together a list of the top 11 terms to help get you familiar with what you can learn if you choose to become a Cannabis Dispensary Technician.

  1. Budtender

Marijuana dispensaries hire budtenders, or cannabis dispensary technicians, to sell their products.  A budtender answers questions, gives suggestions to customers, handles products, and explains the products being sold.

  1. Cannabichromene

CBC comes from cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) produced by the cannabis plant. CBC is not psychoactive, so it doesn’t produce the high associated with THC. CBC binds with receptors in the body that perceive pain and reacts with these receptors to reduce pain.

  1. Cannabidiol

CBD is one of the most commonly used cannabinoids extracted from the cannabis plant. After CBD is removed from the plant, it is mixed with a carrier oil such as hemp seed or coconut oil. It is known to have therapeutic effects to alleviate nerve issues, PTSD, physical pain, epilepsy, and autism.

  1. Cannabinoid

This is a class of chemical compounds that trigger cannabinoid-altering neurotransmitter releases in the brain and body. At least 113 different cannabinoids are known to be present in cannabis.

  1. Cannabitriol

CBT is one of the less common cannabinoids because it is not always present in cannabis. When it is present, the concentration is very low.  There are nine different types of CBT. CBT is very similar in structure to THC, but researchers have not yet determined if it affects the human body in the same way as other cannabinoids.

  1. Dispensary

In states where marijuana is legal, you can purchase medical and recreational marijuana from a licensed dispensary.  These stores are regulated establishments that can educate consumers about the various types of cannabis available.

  1. Edible

While some cannabis products are smoked, there are many options today that can be consumed as food products. These products are made to taste good while delivering specific doses of THC and CBD. There is a wide variety of edibles including brownies, cookies, candies, chocolates, beverages, and jams.

  1. Hemp

Although both hemp and marijuana are classified as cannabis, they are different.  Most significantly, while hemp does contain some THC, it does not have enough to create the high traditionally associated with the marijuana plant. The fibers from the stalk are extremely versatile, durable, and strong, and are used to make a variety of products including rope, paper, fabrics, biodegradable plastics, oil, and concrete.

  1. Marijuana

This is the term for the dried flowers, seeds, leaves, and stems of the cannabis plant. It is known for its mind-altering properties that result from the THC it contains.

  1. Medical Marijuana

This refers to the cultivation, processing, and possession of marijuana for the treatment of diseases and medical conditions. In order to purchase medical marijuana, it must be legal in your state, and you must have a condition that qualifies you for medical marijuana use. In this case, a licensed doctor can then write you a prescription for medical marijuana.

  1. Tetrahydrocannabinol

THC is the psychoactive compound that is responsible for the psychological effects of cannabis. THC causes cells in the brain to release dopamine, which is what creates its feelings of euphoria.

How to Learn More

This list is just the beginning of what you can learn at cannabiscareer.com. We offer a Dispensary Tech Certificate that will give you a deep understanding of what a Dispensary Tech does and the underlying chemistry of how cannabis works on the body. Our online courses give you the confidence you need to secure a job as a Cannabis Dispensary Technician.

Understanding the Laws Regulating Medical Marijuana

What is Medical Marijuana?

Medical marijuana refers to any part of the cannabis plant that can be used to alleviate a variety of health conditions. When people use medical marijuana, they are seeking relief from pain and medical symptoms, not to get high.

The cannabis that is legally sold in dispensaries for medicinal purposes is typically the same as the kind used for pleasure. However, as research continues to identify how the chemicals in the cannabis plant react in the human body, new strains of medical marijuana are being developed with a focus on health benefits and fewer chemicals that cause mind altering effects.

CBD vs. THC

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of the most commonly used cannabinoids extracted from the cannabis plant. After CBD is removed from the plant, it is mixed with a carrier oil such as hemp seed or coconut oil. It is known to have therapeutic effects to alleviate conditions such as nerve issues, PTSD, physical pain, epilepsy, and autism.

THC is the psychoactive compound that is responsible for the psychological effects of cannabis. THC causes cells in the brain to release dopamine, which is what creates its feelings of euphoria.

CBD affects the body very differently than THC. Compared to THC, it would take almost 100 times more CBD to have any impact on the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Unlike THC, CBD does not cause any feelings of euphoria or intoxication, which makes it an acceptable medical treatment that is safer than the addiction and overdose issues associated with opioids that are traditionally prescribed to manage pain.

Federal vs. State Marijuana Laws

Cannabis is a prohibited substance according to the Controlled Substances Act that was passed in 1970.  Under this act, the Drug Enforcement Administration considers marijuana  a Schedule I drug.  This means that it is prohibited because of its potential for abuse, and there are not believed to be any medically acceptable uses.

Many more laws regarding the use of cannabis have been added, amended, repealed, and reinstated since the 70s.  Today, there are over 30 states that have legalized the possession of medical marijuana.  One of the main concerns with legalizing marijuana in individual states is that it is still considered illegal by the federal government. Federal laws take precedence over state laws, which means that you can be arrested and prosecuted for having and using medical marijuana, even if it is legal in your state.

Most of the state medical marijuana laws protect not only the users of medical marijuana, but they also protect their caregivers who may supply their medical marijuana. Many of the state laws include lists of specific conditions that qualify for the use of medical marijuana.

FDA Approval

Currently, the Food and Drug Administration has not approved cannabis for the treatment of any specific diseases or conditions. However, the FDA has approved some drugs that do contain cannabis.  These include Epidiolex, Marinol, Syndros, and Cesamet. These cannabis-derived drugs can only be purchased with a prescription from a licensed healthcare practitioner.

Learn More About Medical Marijuana

The legalization of medical cannabis is advancing worldwide, and there is much more that you can learn about medical marijuana and its use in the healthcare industry.  cannabiscareer.com, a leader in education with nationally accredited colleges, offers courses to help educate the growing global community of healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients who want to learn about the science and clinical data behind medical cannabis.

Scroll to top